Posts

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INSIDE ITERATE: New Materials Round Up with Matt Beamish

Our new materials round up has been devised in collaboration with Design Engineer, Matt Beamish; it features some of the most ground-breaking new materials we have either used, encountered or been inspired by recently. Huge strides are being taken to deliver new sustainable materials that don’t demand a compromise in the quality and finish consumers have come to expect. The result of this, is new materials that tackle the heart of the waste crisis with a combination of biochemistry and commercial awareness in order to present viable alternatives.

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INSIDE ITERATE: The Bigger Picture of Product Sustainability with Thomas Gray

Inside ITERATE sustainability is a subject that comes up a lot. From conversations with Clients to using sustainable design principles in the products we design. Thomas Gray is one the design engineers in the ITERATE team and this week’s article is inspired by a conversation with Tom about how product-based businesses have a responsibility to consider sustainability beyond just materials and marketing.

Sustainability is widely revered as a cornerstone of a responsible product and brand. This focus on sustainability has been driven by the voices of consumers who for years have pushed for more environmentally-conscious choices to be offered by brands. There’s no doubt that sustainability is and will continue to be a top priority for consumers. But, how can businesses live by this same value? The most successful product-based businesses are those that don’t just answer the demand with words, but who embed environmentally-considered processes into their business models and supply chains. Some go even further, recognising that sustainable systems have the power to enhance product experience.

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New Members of Sustainable Development Charter

As product designers, we are constantly aware of our surroundings and our responsibility to the environment. When we create new designs at ITERATE, we actively employ techniques to ensure that our products can be disassembled by avoiding use of glues and other permanent joining methods. In cases where we use plastic, we design-in identification symbols, allowing the material to be recycled after its life-in-service. As well as aiming to reduce the number of parts and subsequently material required to build a product. Read more